Courses

New to bookbinding? Then start with our beginners course Industrial Revolution where you will learn to bind the books that we are all familiar with: the paperback and the hardback.
With our intermediate course 'Merchants and Tradesmen' we step back in time to make long and link stitch bindings. Previous experience is recommended.
For the advaned course Printing Presses and Private Collectors, you need to have followed one of the two other courses. In this course we make a classic binding in leather with raised bands and gold decorations.

Course details

Click + to read

OxBindery_P1060088_000

from printed to bound editions – the modern book emerges

With the steam engine came the publishers' binding. The traditionally hand bound book was replaced by its mechanized equivalent: the case binding and later the paperback.

The face of the bookshop changed to what we are now familiar with. The customer could now buy books readily bound from the shelf instead of loose printed sheets that had to be bound up by a bookbinder. By the turn of the 20th century the bookbinding process was fully mechanised.

Course contents

In this course you will get familiar with paper, thread and glue and learn how to bind your own copybook, paperback and small hardback journal.

Along all the handwork you will also get a glimpse into the history of bookbinding in the 19th century.

On the Saturday we will get to grips with paper and board and stitch our very first section into a copybook.

On the Saturday afternoon we really get folding, trimming and sewing towards a paperback as a preparation to Sundays hardback.

The Sunday is entirely dedicated to the journal hard back binding. In the morning we will sew and finish the second text block. In the afternoon we measure and make a cover to finish our hardback journal

Programme

Saturday

9.30 – 13.00

  • Welcome with tea and coffee
  • Introduction of ourselves, the bindery and its equipment
  • Getting in touch with paper and its grain direction
  • Folding your first section and binding it into a copy book
  • Folding and trimming sections in preparation for the next bindings

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch

14.00 – 16.00

  • Learning to sew your first text block
  • Binding it into a paperback

16.00 - … Afternoon tea

Sunday

10.00 – 12.00

  • Sew your second text block on tapes
  • Glueing and backing your text block

12.00 – 13.00 Lunch

13.00 – 16.00

  • Measuring spine and boards, making a bare cover for your text block
  • Measuring cover material and finishing your cover
  • Putting ‘the book in the cover’, casing the text block in the cover.
 

OxBindery_P1060091_000

from words of wisdom to accounting and record keeping

13th century onward: the first stationery bindings

In the late middle ages middle class of educated tradesmen and merchants emerged. To conduct their business they had to keep records. Trade routes opened up, silk and paper found their way from the far and middle east into Europe.
Paper, the writing material from the Arabs, was the affordable choice for the new middle class,
and for easy access bound in vernacular bindings with long and link stitches. It is the
fore runner of the modern ringbinder.

You will learn to make a:

  • Long stitch binding
  • Link stitch binding

Course contents:

On the Saturday you will a little recap on paper and its grain direction, after which you’ll start folding sections from plain sheets. The sections will be trimmed and punched in preparation for sewing,
On the Saturday afternoon you will be introduced to parchment that will be used to make the cover. You will learn to measure on the parchment, crease folds, add leather spine reinforcements and punch sewing holes. You will sew the first bookblock directly into the parchment cover using long stitches.
On Sunday morning you will make the second parchment cover and sew the bookbock in it using link stitching
On Sunday afternoon you will finish both bindings with leather tie and wrap around straps. When there is time left you can add a decorative weaving pattern on the long stitch binding

Programme

Saturday

9.30 – 13.00

  • Welcome with tea and coffee
  • Getting in touch with paper and its grain direction
  • Folding, trimming and punching sections in preparation for the long and link stitch bindings

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch

14.00 – 16.00

  • Short introduction to parchment
  • Measuring and preparing the first parchment cover with spine panels and stitching holes
  • Sew the sections directly in the cover with long stitches

16.00 - … Afternoon tea

Sunday

10.00 – 12.00

  • Measuring and preparing the second parchment cover with spine panels and stitching holes
  • Sew the sections directly in the cover with link stitches

12.00 – 13.00 Lunch

13.00 – 16.00

  • Finishing the two bindings with leather ties
  • Finishing the long stitch binding with weaving patterns.

OxBindery_P1060097_000

15th – 18th century: the book gets into the public domain

The invention of the printing press ­ in the 15th century ­ and the introduction of paper, lifted the book out of its secluded monastic environment and made it accessible for a greater audience. It allowed for cheaper book production in larger quantities. The printed word spread like wildfire and fuelled the

Reformation. The rediscovery of the classics in the Renaissance, brought a new self confidence

to the western world: humanism. Libraries were not any longer only centres of learning but became status symbols for rich private collectors, expressed in leather bound books with lavish gold decorations.

Course contents

You will learn to make a:

• quarter leather binding with raised bands,

• stitch on endbands

• practice with gold leaf make gold line decorations

Programme

9.30 – 13.00

  • Welcome with tea and coffee
  • Introduction to this weekends course
  • Getting in touch with paper and its grain direction
  • Folding your first section and binding it into a pamphlet
  • Fold sections and endpapers
  • Mark, punch and press in preparation of sewing
  • Coffee break
  • Sew on sewing frame
  • Glue the bookblock

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch

14.00 – 16.00

  • Cut, round and back the bookblock
  • Make and attach boards

Sunday

10.00 – 13.00

  • Stitch (or paste) on endbands
  • Coffee break
  • Introduction to leather with leather paring exercises
  • Prepare and add leather spine
  • Introduction to gold leaf. Practice with faux gold.

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch

14.00 – 17.00

  • Add paper decoratives
  • Paste down endpapers
  • Adding gold decorations

Further info

Course times:

10 a.m - 4 p.m. Register from 9.30 a.m.

Course fees:

All courses incl. materials and lunch
Beginners: 175 euro
Intermediate: 200 euro
Advanced: 225 euro
All courses are limited to two places
For course dates, availability and to book see the column on the right

Course dates 2017

Course dates (click on a date to book):

Industrial Revolution (beginners)


Merchants and Tradesmen (intermediate)


Printing Presses and Private Collectors (advanced)

Testimonials